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Adoption Services


Adoption Services

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Adoption Services


Adoption Services

Adoption Services

The goal of foster care is to reunify children with their biological parents and families. However, there are instances in which reunification is not safe or in the best interest of the child placed in foster care and the parental rights are terminated. In such instances, the foster child becomes eligible for adoption. The Binsfield Law mandates that foster children receive permanency within one year, and therefore; by the time a child has been in foster care for one year, the courts must decide if the permanency plan is still to reunify or to terminate parental rights. In the event that parental rights are terminated, the permanency plan becomes to secure an adoptive placement for the child. 

In cases when the parental rights are terminated and there are no relatives available to adopt the children, the current foster parent is eligible to adopt. Even in cases when a relative appears after a year, there is a trend that the courts will approve adoptions with the foster family who has been caring for the child for that year in care. Usually, relatives who adopt do so after fostering the children in their home through a Relative Placement. Fostering Futures will facilitate adoptions of children with foster families, either in the case of relative placements or non-related foster families, and assure that the adoption is timely and well organized. Adoptive families are usually eligible for reimbursement (at the same foster care rate that was being provided throughout foster care) until the child graduates from high school. All adopted children qualify for medical insurance through Medicaid and they are also eligible for funding for at least the first two years of higher education. The child may also qualify through the adoption subsidy unit in Lansing for therapy until they are 18 years old.

Becoming a Foster Parent


Becoming a Foster Parent

Becoming a Foster Parent


Becoming a Foster Parent

How to Become a Licensed Foster Parent

Its as easy as 1, 2, 3!

  1.  Begin by making contact with the agency and request to learn about or become involved in the licensing process. All Fostering Futures potential foster parents will receive 3 hours of orientation, and 12 hours of pre-service training, which includes but is not limited to: the purpose of foster care, characteristics and needs of the children placed by the agency, attachment and separation issues, impact of fostering on the foster family, role of the foster family, licensing process, grievance procedures, agency foster care policies and procedures as well as provisions of the Childrens' Ombudsman Act and Children Protection Act will be reviewed. An additional 6 hours of ongoing training is than required each year which will be provided by the agency or within the community. At least half of the ongoing 6 hours of training must be received directly from Fostering Futures.
  2. A potential foster parent will complete The Pride Training Program, which is included in the 12 hours stated above of pre-service training hours. The Pride training involving topics of teamwork, developmental needs, attachment, loss, strengthening family relationships, and meeting developmental needs and discipline. All these training will be offered by the agency in a small group setting to ensure that all persons get an opportunity to ask questions and receive individual attention. Materials will be distributed for potential foster parents to take home, read more and keep for their ongoing review.
  3. A licensing worker will make a series of home visits to ensure the home is safe and in compliance with state rules and laws governing foster care. A carbon monoxide detector, smoke detectors, and proper bedrooms are all necessary along with a safe environment within the home and yard. All pools must be enclosed, and any wood burning stoves must pass the inspection of the local fire department. The State of Michigan pays to have all well water and septic fields tested prior to licensure to ensure safety for all. The potential foster parent will also have to undergo a medical exam confirming good health to foster, a protective service and criminal clearance, TB test, three references from unrelated persons, and an assessment of their abilities to foster and care for others.

The desire to help others, a strong value system, good communication skills and a willingness to look at oneself are additional features of good foster parenting and qualifications. The agency will be very timely in its responses to inquiries and the process of licensing.

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Foster Parent Licensing


Foster Parent Licensing

Foster Parent Licensing


Foster Parent Licensing

Foster Parent Licensing

Fostering Futures is a licensing agency and licenses persons interested in becoming foster parents. The agency is BCAL approved by the State of Michigan and has a state contract to provide foster care services to youth. 

To become a licensed foster parent, an individual or couple must first attend an orientation session. After orientation is completed, an application for licensure can be provided and a licensing worker will be assigned to your family. The licensing worker will schedule a visit to your home to meet with your family and begin gathering information for the licensing Home Study. The Home Study includes information such as: a criminal background check and fingerprints, information about the composition of your existing immediate family, health status, financial stability, family activities and relationships, references, a home inspection, and further information about the types of children for which you wish to provide care. 
 

Begin by making contact with the agency and request to learn about or become involved in the licensing process. All Fostering Futures potential foster parents will receive 3 hours of orientation, and 12 hours of pre-service training, which includes but is not limited to: the purpose of foster care, characteristics and needs of the children placed by the agency, attachment and separation issues, impact of fostering on the foster family, role of the foster family, licensing process, grievance procedures, agency foster care policies and procedures as well as provisions of the Childrens' Ombudsman Act and Children Protection Act will be reviewed. An additional 6 hours of ongoing training is than required each year which will be provided by the agency or within the community. At least half of the ongoing 6 hours of training must be received directly from Fostering Futures.
A potential foster parent will complete The Pride Training Program, which is included in the 12 hours stated above of pre-service training hours. The Pride training involving topics of teamwork, developmental needs, attachment, loss, strengthening family relationships, and meeting developmental needs and discipline. All these training will be offered by the agency in a small group setting to ensure that all persons get an opportunity to ask questions and receive individual attention. Materials will be distributed for potential foster parents to take home, read more and keep for their ongoing review.
A licensing worker will make a series of home visits to ensure the home is safe and in compliance with state rules and laws governing foster care. A carbon monoxide detector, smoke detectors, and proper bedrooms are all necessary along with a safe environment within the home and yard. Any wood burning stoves must pass the inspection of the local fire department. The State of Michigan pays to have all well water and septic fields tested prior to licensure to ensure safety for all. The potential foster parent will also have to undergo a medical exam confirming good health to foster, a protective service and criminal clearance, TB test, three references from unrelated persons, and an assessment of their abilities to foster and care for others.


The desire to help others, a strong value system, good communication skills and a willingness to look at oneself are additional features of good foster parenting and qualifications. The agency will be very timely in its responses to inquiries and the process of licensing.

Qualification


Qualification


Who Qualifies to be a Foster Parent?

The BCAL state laws state that a foster parent must be at least 18 years of age and of good morale character. Fostering Futures recognizes the additional need for a foster parent to be emotionally grounded, able to meet their own emotional and physical needs, be financially stable, mature, patient, and aware of the many problems that a foster youth will present. 

Married couples, single adults, and same sex partners are all welcomed under the umbrella of foster care in Fostering Futures. The agency welcomes all persons dedicated to the care and well-being of children, and also dedicates itself to these persons willing to become involved in the child welfare system. 

Persons living in houses, apartments, renting or owning are all capable of fostering in a quality manner provided the home, and community, is safe and offers the experience and opportunities that all children need to grow. People qualifying to be foster parents will need to undergo fingerprinting, protective service and criminal clearances as well as a medical exam concluding they are fit to foster. Persons who have limited involvement with the law in their backgrounds are not automatically excluded but would require additional and detailed assessment of the events that occurred and evidence of rehabilitation and change.